10 Critical Neurological Symptoms Of Lyme Disease You Need To Know

The bite of an infected tick causes an infection known as Lyme disease. The illness is caused by bacterium borrelia burgdorferi. Ticks are usually prominent in grassy and wooded locations so people living in these kinds of areas should be wary and take every means of precaution when going outdoors. Take note of the possible Lyme disease symptoms which include a rash in the area of the bite which can expand over time and many flu-like symptoms like fever, body pains, fatigue and chills. Apart from the symptoms that appear in the earlier stage of Lyme disease, neurological symptoms can also begin to manifest weeks or even years after being infected.

Numbness

People who have nerve damage or nerve disease often experience a sensation of numbness. Many people describe the feeling as something like pins and needles on their skin, and people suffering from Lyme disease will often feel a prickling or burning pain in the affected area. Unlike paralysis where patients are unable to move, numbness causes patients to experience a loss of sensation.

Uncommon sensations in the limbs

The muscles of patients’ limbs will often undergo a weakening sensation. Tingling sensations in the extremities, bruising, burning and swelling may be experienced.

Bell’s palsy

If you are experiencing Bell’s palsy, you are probably have Lyme disease. Bell’s palsy is a disorder of the muscles of the face where the muscles become paralyzed due to complications of the nerves of the face muscles. There is often a partial or whole paralysis of the face of the patients.

Meningitis

Approximately 15 percent of those affected by Lyme diseases have been infected in the membranes, around their spinal cord and the brain. This is called meningitis. The patients who are suffering from meningitis, the main symptoms of this are stiff neck and headache. Over-the-counter medicine may cannot cure this. They also become sensitive to light.

Problems with vision

Patients may also feel changes in their vision. They may feel distortion, blurry vision, night blindness and sometimes they even experience loss of sight.

Difficulty in concentrating

A patient’s focus is affected by the physical conditions of Lyme disease. These patients may find it difficult to concentrate on a single task at a time.

Loss of memory

People suffering from Lyme disease may also experience memory loss. They can have difficulty recalling details and may feel disoriented when trying to remember something.

Encephalopathy

When Lyme disease is left untreated in its early stages, Lyme encephalopathy may occur. Some symptoms of encephalopathy are dramatic mood swings, depression and a tingling sensation in the limbs.

Sleep disturbances

Lyme disease has a variety of symptoms, including influencing once stable sleep patterns. They can have sleep disturbances such as insomnia and sleep apnea.

Cognitive impairment

Cognitive impairment may be caused by Lyme disease. Some patients may have some trouble thinking clearly and making any rational decisions. Also associated with cognitive impairment is poor concentration and memory loss.

In order to be sure Lyme disease is properly treated from the outset, it is important to understand exactly what the symptoms are. It is said that prevention is better than cure so it is always good to take proper precautions to avoid the illness.

To get additional information on Lyme disease symptoms, you can go to http://www.lymediseaseblog.com/lyme-disease-symptoms/.

Nightmare – May be a harbinger of Parkinson’s disease

British “Lancet Neurology” magazine published a new study claims that the nightmare of the night may be one of the first signs of Parkinson’s disease. Scientists have found that those people who screamed or cried in his sleep, would be more likely to suffer from Parkinson’s disease in five years.

Experts found that people with “REM sleep disturbance disorder” are more likely to have Parkinson’s disease or other forms of dementia. REM sleep disturbance symptoms including rapid eye movement (REM) sleep stages of deep sleep or nightmares occur with suddenly kicking action. REM stage is often the brain is “off” state, so that muscles are normal rest. However, patients with REM sleep disturbance of people, the brain is still active, have nightmares, and sometimes extremely tense muscles.

Scientists of Barcelona Spain have discovered that one in five of older than 60 patients in the REM sleep disturbances suffer from Parkinson’s disease or other forms of dementia. New research shows that sleep disorders, brain disorders in the elderly is one of the first symptoms. This study will help doctors diagnose early Alzheimer’s disease Parkinson’s psychosis, so that patients get better treatment as soon as possible.

New study charge surveyed 43 diagnosed patients older than 60 years old of age with REM sleep disorders. The results found that 30% of them occurred with varying degrees of neurological disorders after two and half years, most of them were diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease. Some of the patients with Alzheimer’s disease are with neuronal cell death, so patients do not have enough chemical dopamine. The lack of dopamine will make the elderly be difficulties in operation and memory loss.

The new study reaffirms the United States earlier this year a study “the old man to sleep kicking, old crazy can happen.” U.S. Mayo Clinic scientists said that nightmare could be a signal of the risk of Parkinson’s disease even in 50 years.

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10 Critical Neurological Symptoms Of Lyme Disease You Need To Know

Some neurological symptoms of Lyme disease that you should look out for are numbness, abnormal feelings in the limbs, Bell’s palsy, meningitis, vision problems, difficulty in concentrating, memory loss, encephalopathy, sleep disturbances, and cognitive impairment.

Lyme disease is an infection caused due to the bite of an infected tick. The illness is caused by the bacterium known as Borrelia burgdorferi. People living in these kinds of areas should be wary and take every means of precaution when going outdoors since ticks are usually prominent in grassy and wooded locations. Lyme disease symptoms can include a rash in the area of the bite that can expand over time and several flu-like symptoms such as fever, body pains, fatigue and chills. Apart from the Lyme disease symptoms that appear in the earlier stage, sometimes neurological symptoms start to manifest weeks or even years after being infected.

Numbness

Numbness is the typical symptom of nerves suffering from a disease or damage. People suffering from Lyme disease often experience a form of Neuralgia that they say feels like pins and needles pricking the their skin. Unlike paralysis where patients are unable to move, numbness causes patients to experience a loss of sensation.

Abnormal feelings in the limbs

Patients often say that their arms and legs will feel weak. They may also experience swelling, burning, bruising, and a tingling sensation in their arms and legs.

Bell’s palsy

Bell’s palsy is another symptom of having a Lyme diseases. Bell’s palsy is characterized by a sudden paralysis of the facial muscles caused by complications in the patient’s facial nerves. Patients can and usually do feel paralyzed in at least half of their face or more.

Meningitis

As much as 15% of Lyme disease patients are infected in the membranes that are located around the spinal cord and brain. In meningitis patients experience stiff necks and headaches that are not cured by typical over-the-counter medicines. In addition, they experience a heightened sensitivity to light.

Difficulty in eyesight or vision

Patients may feel changes in their vision. They may feel distortion, blurry vision, night blindness and sometimes they even experience loss of sight.

Problems in terms of concentration

Lyme disease is a physical condition that is known to affect a patient’s concentration. Lack of focus and attention on one task is a feature of such patients.

Cognitive disorder

Memory problems are another symptom of Lyme disease. When trying to remember something they may have difficulty in recalling the details and may feel little disoriented.

Encephalopathy

When Lyme disease is left untreated in its early stages, then it may cause Lyme encephalopathy. You should be aware of the common symptoms of this diseases which include dramatic mood swings, irritability, depression and a tingling sensation in the patient’s limbs.

Disturbed sleep

The sleeping habits are changed in the people who are infected with Lyme disease. These people may suffer from apnea, insomnia and other sleep disorders and disturbances.

Cognitive impairment

Lyme disease can also cause cognitive impairment. Patients may have difficulty thinking and making rational decisions. Cognitive impairment is associated with poor concentration and memory loss.

In order to be sure Lyme disease is properly treated from the outset, it is important to understand exactly what the symptoms are. All the same, prevention is still better than treatment, so follow every means of precaution to avoid getting infected with the illness.

To get additional information on symptoms of Lyme disease, you can go to http://www.lymediseaseblog.com/lyme-disease-symptoms/.

West Nile Neurological Disease – Part 3 – Focus on Faith

In 2007, West Nile Neurological Disease paralyzed my husband, Rick, in three limbs, and caused multiple complications, including encephalitis. The virus nearly stole him from me, but mercy sent us instead into a long exile at a rehab centre several hours from home. All along what has now become a multi-year journey, we have clung tightly to God.

We had practiced for this: my husband has been a Christian clergyman for over thirty years. I’ve been a Christ-follower since childhood. Faith is central to our lives. Part of that faith is our belief that though the world is rife with disaster and difficulty–to which we are not immune–we have a living, loving God who walks beside us, holds us up when we can’t stand, and pays attention to our prayers. During our journey down the Nile, we fed our faith in many ways. Here are a few:

Likely the most spiritually nourishing practice became our reading of scripture. Daily, as I sat by my husband’s bed, I read to him aloud from the Bible. He often told me how those ancient words from which he had preached for three decades, were the only thing that took his mind off his paralysis and constant, traumatizing pain.

We prayed together often–holding hands. Because Rick’s encephalitis and pain made this familiar habit difficult, I did most of the talking aloud to God. He told me he found that extremely healing.

We made time for regular enjoyment of nature. The rehab centre had a solarium to which I pushed Rick often, simply to sit and enjoy the changing seasons outside the tall windows. Chickadees, sparrows, even rabbits, entertained us early in the mornings. As he improved, I was able to wheel his chair outside where we “rolked” (rolled and walked, a term coined by another patient who had tragically lost her legs) down to a path that followed outline of a small lake.

Even when we didn’t feel like it on many Sundays, and even though the services weren’t the kind we were accustomed to, we took in the weekly chapel service the facility offered. Surrounded by others in wheelchairs, we experienced the “fellowship of the similarly afflicted”–a bond with other disabled people that endures to this day, even though Rick has graduated to a walker.

We made time for music that boosted us spiritually. Not always gospel songs, but especially gospel songs. Though the old hymns of the church sung as commonly these days, they kept creeping out through the fabric of our joint memory to encourage us. I often sat at the piano in the common area and played them by memory. Other patients and family members joined us sometimes. God, we know, did too, regularly.

I sang one of those hymns almost every morning. It emerged without waiting for an invitation, almost immediately after waking. The archaic words seemed both relevant and crucial for me: Oh, for a faith that will not shrink, though pressed by every foe; that will not tremble on the brink of any earthly woe. Lord, give me such a faith as this…!

I also spent hours reading–after getting into bed and before rising. From other people of faith, who had written on the subjects of pain, grief, and loss, I gained new perspectives, which I often shared with Rick. Those words have served us well all along the Nile.

If pirates have boarded your boat, I encourage you to board an even larger one – the stable boat of spiritual direction, comfort, and provision. Keep (or develop) an active faith in God. It will be your most effective weapon in battle.

You’ve just read article three in the E-Zine series: West Nile Neurological Disease–Fighting Life’s Pirates.Read the complete story of our West Nile journey in West Nile Diary, One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease available on Amazon.

P.S. Wear repellent.

copyright 2010, by Kathleen Gibson. If you copy, copy right, and for non-profit use only. Please include author credit, and a link to my website, below.

Kathleen Gibson is a Canadian author and newspaper columnist whose work has been published in global print and online media. Through articles, interviews and her book, West Nile Diary–One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease, she and her husband, Rick, have raised the level of West Nile Disease awareness across North America. Together, they point others to the beautiful strength that comes from cultivating a solid faith in God. Kathleen’s latest book is Practice by Practice, The Art of Everyday Faith. More info at http://www.kathleengibson.ca

5 Neurological Complications Of Lyme Disease To Be Aware Of

Lyme disease, left untreated, may cause a number of debilitating neurological conditions that attack the body and mind.

People get Lyme disease from the bites of infected ticks. The early signs of Lyme disease are inclusive of a characteristic rash which appears around the part of the body where the bite occurred, fever, chills, headaches, muscle and joint pains, and swollen lymph nodes. Lyme disease shares symptoms with more common illnesses and as a result people that have contracted it end up using inappropriate treatments or miss getting treatment entirely. Unfortunately, when left untreated, Lyme disease can lead to severe complications. In the second stage of Lyme disease, neurological complications like numbness, severe headaches, and visual disturbances may occur. Lyme disease is associated with the following neurological complications:

Radiculitis

A very painful radiculitis is among the first neurological complications that are experienced by people with Lyme disease. A radiating pain along the dermatome of a nerve often characterizes radiculitis. This condition generally occurs within the first few weeks to months of the infection. Patients usually experience sensory, motor and mixed symptoms and conditions like weakness and sudden reflex and sensory changes. Unfortunately, these symptoms are sometimes mistaken as indicators of nerve-impingement.

Cranial neuropathies, or head symtoms

As well as the patient’s cranial nerve, cranial neuropathies can affect the nerves involved in sensory processing, in other words sight, sound, smell, taste and touch. As Lyme disease progresses the multiple cranial nerves of can all be affected at the same time in someone infected with the disease. An estimated 50%-70% of total patients that suffer from neurological symptoms experience this complication.

Intracranial hypertension

A rare neurological complication of Lyme disease is intracranial hypertension. It is more commonly experienced by children and adolescents. Headaches and papilledema are common side effects associated with intracranial hypertension. Papilledema, the swelling of a patient’s optic disc, develops over a span of a few hours to a few weeks. In some cases, abnormalities in Cerebrospinal Fluid may also occur.

Inflammation of the brain and spinal cord

Sometimes resembling ischemic patterns, encephalomyelitis usually includes brainstem abnormalities. It can be medically proofed that the parenchyma is involved. Cerebellar syndromes, motion disorders, hemiparesis, and spastic paraparesis are all indicators of this complication. This complication is more common in European nations than in North America.

Encephalopathy

Encephalopathy is one of the most common complications that occurs in the later stages of Lyme disease. Those with this problem experience minor or even major cognitive changes and polyradiculoneuropathy. Encephalopathy as well as other late stage infections may be accompanied by severe fatigue, sleeping problems, extreme irritability, mood swings, photophobia, difficulty finding words, and problems in writing or speaking. There have been reports of sensory issues as well. The severity of these symptoms may differ and are considered to be somewhat inconsistent.

Early identification of the symptoms of Lyme disease and administration of immediate treatment are the best ways to prevent it from developing into worse neurological complications.

To learn more about various URL, go to http://www.lymediseaseblog.com/lyme-disease-symptoms/.

West Nile Neurological Disease – Part 1 – Our Battle Begins

Are you intimate with one or more of life’s multitudinous pirates? Catastrophe. Illness. Accident. Sudden disability. Financial ruin. Severed relationships.

They specialize in surprise. They often attack when the little boats of our lives are in full sail, when the day is fine and the sky clear. When we least expect trouble. Suddenly, without warning, the life we knew is no more. Gone. Flipped upside down as easily as a donut in hot oil.

We’ve lived with a few pirates, my husband and I. The last batch entered our lives quietly a few years ago. It happened in an instant. We didn’t even notice their invasion at first. They arrived in the form of an unseen, unfelt, common summer occurrence. My husband got bit by a mosquito.

The mosquito, we know now, imported a virus onto the little boat of our lives. In the space of a few short days, my husband, Rick, then an active fifty-four year old clergyman, became cognitively disoriented and paralyzed in both legs and his left arm.

Doctors diagnosed him with a severe case of West Nile Neurological Disease (also called West Nile Neuroinvasive Disease). How ironic that the pirate that led the attack was no bigger than his baby fingernail.

After eleven days in ICU, and another almost three weeks on a regular ward, only moments of which he actually remembers, doctors transferred Rick to a rehab center two hours from home.

On a blue and gold September afternoon, I locked our front door behind me and followed the ambulance down the silver stream of highway, past ripening fields of wheat and barley, past herds of grazing cattle to a rehab centre in a nearby city. We stayed there for the next five months, my husband in a double ward room, and I in a rented hostel room right in the centre.

Though he’d already been in hospital for almost a month, it was in that rehab centre that we began learning about what it really means to do battle with the pirates of West Nile Neurological Disease.

We also learned something else: many of the strategies and tools we found helpful are common to all life’s difficulties, no matter the stripe of pirates-or monsters, or madmen, or beasts.

If you’re fighting pirates, be sure to read this entire article series–this is the first. If you’re not fighting pirates, read be sure to read this entire article series. Life can change with the suddenness of a summer squall. One day you’ll need the information you’ll find in one or more of them.

You’ve just read article one in the E-Zine series: West Nile Neurological Disease–Fighting Life’s Pirates.

Read the complete story of our West Nile journey in West Nile Diary, One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease available on Amazon.

P.S. Wear repellent.

copyright 2010, by Kathleen Gibson.

If you copy, copy right, and for non-profit use only. Please include author credit, and a link to my website, below.

Kathleen Gibson is a Canadian author and newspaper columnist whose work has been published in global print and online media. Through articles, interviews and her book, West Nile Diary–One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease, she and her husband, Rick, have raised the level of West Nile Disease awareness across North America. Together, they point others to the beautiful strength that comes from cultivating a solid faith in God. Kathleen’s latest book is Practice by Practice, The Art of Everyday Faith. More info at http://www.kathleengibson.ca

West Nile Neurological Disease – Therapy Remains Essential

A month after the body pirates, as I call the mosquito-borne West Nile neurological disease, ravaged my 54 year-old husband, paralyzing him in three limbs, an ambulance transported him from hospital to a rehab centre. He stayed there for five months, relearning the skills of basic mobility through intensive therapy.

At night I slept at the other end of the centre, in a roughly 10 by 12 foot cement hostel room. During the day I helped where I could, encouraging and assisting as God, the doctor, and the therapists put my husband back together again.

I’ll never forget Rick’s first meeting with his physiotherapist, Errin. Immobilized by poliomyelitis, struggling with encephalitis, and beleaguered by constant nausea–all consequences of the virus–he lay on his back on the therapy couch, kidney basin firmly in place, eyes clenched shut, brow furrowed in pain.

Errin said, “Well, Rick, what are your goals for your time with us?”

He thought for a moment. “Well,” he said finally, slowly…”my left arm is weak.”

Errin waited a while. When it seemed clear he wasn’t about to continue, she gave an encouraging “Mmm hmm?”

“I need it…” he said, “I need it to drive my scooter.”

He’d only gotten that scooter the previous summer. He’d wanted one most of his life. It was his escape hatch, the thing that helped him flee the pressures of his busy professional life as a spiritual caregiver.

Errin, a true professional, didn’t laugh, and she didn’t point out his almost total-body paralysis. She just said, “Well, I can tell your scooter is pretty important to you. How about we work first on getting you to be able to sit up?”

He’d already been getting some therapy at the local hospital–minor, compared to the paces they put him through at the rehab centre. For the next five months I watched as he and both his therapists–physio and occupational–and their assistants worked together, through terrible pain at first, then as it lessened, more eagerly.

I watched him, with their encouragement and patient, cheerful help, learn to roll over, to sit up, feed himself, dress himself, propel his wheelchair with his own feet, stand up, take tiny steps, then larger ones, then to walk with a walker, until finally those therapists felt it safe to let him leave the security of the rehab centre.

After his release, Rick continued with local therapy, both with professional therapists, and on his own. Almost three years later, he continues therapy on his own–regular exercise–walking, primarily. Though his body will not likely progress past the point it reached after two years post-infection, exercise is necessary to keep his muscles from atrophying.

Rarely (if ever) has Rick ever said, after therapy, “That felt so great! I’d love to do that again.” The therapy, several hours a day, pains him greatly. Nevertheless, he has learned to value it. Why? Simply because of the benefits it brings to both body and mind.

Pain is an inevitible side-affect of any type of therapy. But achieving maximum possible recovery is another. In Rick’s case “maximum” is still far less than what constituted his normal for the first fifty-three plus years of his life. We have learned to accept that, and be grateful for it. Yet he continues to work to maintain his recovery.

Along our West Nile journey, we’ve met numerous people who should be employing therapy to assist them in their battles with the circumstances that have flipped their lives over. Yet they refuse it. Whether they need physical, occupational, cognitive, emotional, or spiritual therapy, their excuse is that it’s too slow, too painful, too inconvenient.

Too bad. Along with faith and hope, therapy, from trained, reliable practitioners, helps get your boat upright when you’ve been capsized by life’s pirates.

We’ve found another blessing through the many hours Rick has spent in therapy. We’ve gained friends, both the therapists, and people we’ve met in the therapy rooms. We are richer for their healing presence in our lives.

Therapy…seek it. Accept it, no matter the name of your pirates.

You’ve just read article five in the E-Zine series: West Nile Neurological Disease–Fighting Life’s Pirates.

Read the complete story of our West Nile journey in West Nile Diary, One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease available on Amazon.

P.S. Wear repellent.

****

copyright 2010, by Kathleen Gibson. If you copy, copy right, and for non-profit use only. Please include author credit, and a link to my website, below.

Kathleen Gibson is a Canadian author and newspaper columnist whose work has been published in global print and online media. Through articles, interviews and her book, West Nile Diary–One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease, she and her husband, Rick, have raised the level of West Nile Disease awareness across North America. Together, they point others to the beautiful strength that comes from cultivating a solid faith in God. Kathleen’s latest book is Practice by Practice, The Art of Everyday Faith. More info at http://www.kathleengibson.ca

West Nile Neurological Disease – Part 2 – Weapons For the Battle

After what I call the pirates–the mosquito-borne virus that precipitated my husband’s case of West Nile Neurological Disease–invaded his body, assaulting his brain with encephalitis and paralyzing him in three limbs, our lives changed dramatically.

After a month in our local hospital, fighting for his life at first, doctors transferred Rick to a rehab centre two hours from our home. There his brain continued its slow road to recovery, and there he began in-depth therapy to relearn all his basic mobility skills.

Most patients, we knew, improve faster if a family member remains with them to help and encourage along the way. The centre had a hostel attached for relatives of the patients. For the duration of his five-month stay I made that my home.

Any room with a view of the sky is a room with a view as far as I’m concerned. My room had that, and more. It had a tree. A HUGE maple that filled my window and touched that sky. It also had a view of a courtyard playground which featured as its main attraction, a play-structure. A play structure built like a ship, complete with portholes, a ship’s wheel, a telescope–and a black flag that unfurled in the wind like an ominous specter.

“God,” I prayed, “I’ve always appreciated your sense of humor, but did you have to let the pirates park their ship right outside my window?”

I didn’t spend much time there. I slept in that room. I showered in that room. I wrote in that room until I flopped exhausted over the keyboard. But I spent most of my days at Rick’s side, helping where I could as God and the therapists put Humpty Dumpty back together again.

Almost three years later, the pirates haven’t totally dis-boarded. We’ve lost much–a way of life, among other things. But though he hasn’t regained enough health to return to consistent work, Rick is walking, usually with a walker, and able to enjoy life again.

We’ve gained plenty too. We now live an edited life with a great many changes–plenty of them very good.

We’ve learned much about pirates on our journey down West Nile. How to fight them, how to make friends with them, even how to discover the hidden treasure they bring. Three things have proved monumental in finding our way about in our new normal.

In the rehab centre’s physiotherapy room hung three words, linked vertically with chains. Each word was deeply carved–and would become as deeply etched into both our souls: Faith. Hope. Therapy.

Like a musical motif, the reminder to keep faith, hold onto hope, and employ therapy, repeated itself many times after we first saw that sign. The motif is ongoing–and it has kept our little boat afloat, even in pirate-infested waters.

Why? Because faith, hope, and therapy are not just words. They’re crucial weapons in the business of pirate-fighting.

In the first few days after my husband was admitted to hospital, as I read from the book of Psalms in the Bible, one verse seemed to stand out from the rest–a prayer that God would strengthen hands for battle and fingers for war. At that point I expected to take a healthy husband back home in a week or two. I recall wondering why those verses, but felt I should pray that way, anyway.

I know why now. Our almost three year journey has been a long series of battles. We have needed extra measures of strength every step of the way.

If your life has been flipped upside down by pirates of whatever stripe, remember those words. In a battle one needs strong, reliable weapons. Don’t refuse therapy, whether physical, mental, emotional, or spiritual. Never stop hoping. Most important of all, clutch onto faith.

Kathleen Gibson is a Canadian author and newspaper columnist whose work has been published in global print and online media. Through articles, interviews and her book, West Nile Diary–One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease, she and her husband, Rick, have raised the level of West Nile Disease awareness across North America. Together, they point others to the beautiful strength that comes from cultivating a solid faith in God. Kathleen’s latest book is Practice by Practice, The Art of Everyday Faith. More info at http://www.kathleengibson.ca

You’ve just read article two in the E-Zine series: West Nile Neurological Disease–Fighting Life’s Pirates. Read the complete story of our West Nile journey in West Nile Diary, One Couple’s Triumph Over a Deadly Disease available on Amazon.

P.S. Wear repellant.

copyright 2010, by Kathleen Gibson. If you copy, copy right, and for non-profit use only. Please include author credit, and a link to my website, below.

Neurological Disease Treatment In India

Do you have any further plans to go for a extreme risk brain or spine operation in the near future? The medical facilities provide in India may induce you to having your neurological disease treatment in India at some of the famous multi specialty hospitals in India. With the improved technology and some of the leading neurosurgeons in the world, you can rest assured that you are receiving the best medical care services. Wherever you are hailing from, you will find a multi specialty hospital in India to be one of the best medical centers in the world.

If youve decided to go for neurological disease treatment in India at our multi specialty hospital, Medanta, Gurgaon can be your prime choice; here you will have access to some of the worlds best treatment in the world.

Founded by eminent cardiac surgeon, Dr. Naresh Trehan, the institute has been well-versed with the aim of bringing to India the ultimate standards of medical care along with clinical research, education and training.

Dr. Ahay Jha is chairman of the Institute of Neurosciences. This multi speciality hospital in India has a dedicated team of doctors with the updated technology which provides a comprehensive and multi-disciplinary approach for disorders of brain and spine. The entire team comprises of highly qualified neurologist in delhi, neurosurgeons, intervention neuro-radiologist and other displaces and provide the best possible medical care to patients.

The institute works on the philosophy of patient first treatment which is based on protocols of trusted evaluation of results which will not only ensure proper patient management but will also pave the way for an academic environment. This super specialty hospital in India has facilities for emergency services for the management of acute neurological disorders, advanced neuro-imaging techniques (a 3 Tesla MRI, 256 slice CT scan, PET scan), dedicated neurosurgery and neurology ICUs.

Medanta is a leading multi specialty hospital in India and cancer institute in India provides best medical care services for neurological disease treatment.